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Basic principles of light reflection  and light absorption
 
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Watch the video and learn about the basics principles and types of light reflection light absorption as well as the different variables that determine how the light is reflected and absorbed. Contact Us: Find more about Philips Lighting University here: https://www.philips.com/lightinguniversity Follow us on Social media: Twitter https://twitter.com/SignifyUni LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/signify-lighting-university/?viewAsMember=true Facebook https://www.facebook.com/PhilipsLightingUniversity/ Want more videos? Visit our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/PhilipsLighting Want more nuggets? Visit our playlist of PLU short video nuggets: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLj9hU1O4UB02hL7ABUsWNIZ-PVBoONl9N #LightingUniversity
Views: 27751 Signify
Laws of Reflection | #aumsum
 
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Our topic for today is Laws of Reflection. Consider this ray of light which strikes a mirror. This ray of light is called the incident ray. The point at which the incident ray strikes the mirror is called point of incidence. Draw a line perpendicular to the mirror through the point of incidence. This line is called Normal. The angle which the incident ray makes with the normal is called the angle of incidence. When this ray strikes the mirror, it will bounce off the mirror. This ray which bounces off is called the reflected ray. The angle which the reflected ray makes with the normal is called angle of reflection. Now, let us study the 2 laws of reflection. The angle of incidence is always equal to the angle of reflection. If the angle of incidence is 30 degrees, then the angle of reflection will also be 30 degrees. Remember that, these angles are always measured from the normal, not from the mirror. The incident ray, the normal at the point of incidence and the reflected ray, all lie in the same plane.
Views: 1308992 It's AumSum Time
Light Absorption, Reflection, and Transmission
 
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118 - Light Absorption, Reflection, and Transmission In this video Paul Andersen explains how light can be absorbed, reflected, or transmitted as it moves from one medium to another. The reflection of different wavelengths creates the perceived color of an object. Absorbed light is converted to energy and transmitted light moves through the material. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: “Chlorophyll.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, April 22, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Chlorophyll&oldid=658421433. “Excoecaria Cochinchinensis.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, November 10, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Excoecaria_cochinchinensis&oldid=581002529. “Plant.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, March 27, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Plant&oldid=653794273. “Reflection (physics).” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, April 28, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Reflection_(physics)&oldid=659593985. Starr, Forest & Kim. English: Miconia Calvescens (purple Underside of Leaf). Location: Maui, Nahiku, March 21, 2007. Plants of Hawaii, Image 070321-6058 from http://www.hear.org/starr/plants/images/image/?q=070321-6058. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Starr_070321-6058_Miconia_calvescens.jpg.
Views: 205544 Bozeman Science
How Lasers Work - A Complete Guide
 
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Everyone has seen them, lasers, and have probably teased many cats with them. Just how do those little devices manage to put out this nice beam of light? Lasers are ubiquitous not only in scientific research but also industry – knowing why this is and how they work is the motivation behind discussing it. This video is a complete guide to how a laser works. Website: http://scientized.com/ Social: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/scientized/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/scientized GooglePlus: https://plus.google.com/b/109530759983231016076/ Support: Amazon: http://azon.ly/32dd Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scientized Bitcoin: 1Avw6JPsv3G1YCN3M6nccGh55zbDvquKjY Ethereum: 0xC3a25B66D28b3F2A9c7f6669A4ef56178bCd27cD Music: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music
Views: 264724 Scientized
Principles of Light and Color Measurement
 
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The properties of light that stimulate the eye and build our visual perception—when thoughtfully designed into lighted devices—can create unrivalled visual experiences. Thanks to well-established scientific methods, we can quantify the human eye’s response to light in a mathematical context for use in optical metrology. Light measurement systems like imaging photometers and colorimeters use CIE-matched optical filters and scientific CCDs to apply these methods, capturing meaningful data that guide human-centric design and evaluation of many of today’s devices. Using photometric technology, manufacturers can leverage the standard principles of light and color measurement in design and production to best assess the visual quality of displays, backlit components, and light sources—as they are actually seen and experienced by human users. This provides manufacturers with the means to achieve absolute product quality. Join a webinar hosted by Shannon Roberts, Product Manager at Radiant Vision Systems, as she presents the basic principles of light and color measurement. Shannon will discuss the foundation of photometry and introduce photometric technologies that leverage these principles to accurately quantify the human visual response to ensure quality in light and display products. Topics include: -- How the human eye responds to light and color -- Quantifying color based on CIE tristimulus curves -- Technology designed to replicate human visual response -- Optical metrology systems and benefits of imaging for light measurement
9 Awesome Science Tricks Using Static Electricity!
 
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Add me on Facebook. (click the LIKE button on Facebook to add me) http://www.facebook.com/brusspup Music in the video are songs I created. Song #1: Over Rain iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/over-rain-single/id1033695238 Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Over-Rain-brusspup/dp/B014JXPNSW/ Song #2 Soul Switch Remix - Will be available soon All of these tricks take advantage of static electricity. In general, the lower the humidity, the better these tricks will work. The most impressive one to me is the floating bag trick. Depending on the conditions, you can float an entire grocery sack. 1. Hover Plate: (You need Styrofoam Plates and a cloth) Styrofoam plates are great for static electricity tricks. When you give them a charge and hold one above the other, you can feel an incredible amount of resistance. 2. Can Can Go (You need a coke can, PVC pipe and a cloth) This is a classic but still fun. Try standing the can up and then tip it over with static, or try pulling 2 cans at the same time. 3. Stick Around (You need a small wooden stick, glass jar, thread, tape, PVC pipe and a cloth) This one is fun because half of the time the wooden stick will come toward the pvc pipe, and other times it will move away from the pipe. When it moves away, it will stick the the side of the jar and remain there for a period of time. It also fun to use as large a jar as possible to increase the dramatic effect of the pipe moving the stick from such a large distance. 4. Bubble Trouble (You need bubble solution, plexi-glass, PVC pipe, straw and a cloth. This is a fun trick because the bubbles change their shape and move when the pvc pipe is near. It's also fun to create bubbles inside of bubbles to watch the effect of the static electricity. And also create multiple bubbles on the sheet and watch them all travel toward the pipe. 5. Dancing Balls (You need styrofoam balls, aluminum foil, plexi-glass, cloth, and an area to keep the balls from escaping. This trick is really impressive but can be a bit difficult to recreate. When the plexi-glass plate is charged and placed over the balls, they all jump up and stick to the bottom of the glass. For a few moments they travel around sporadically until they finally settle. But when you put your finger near the glass, they all start jumping around. It's also fun to use these balls with styrofoam plates / cups. If you place the ball on a charged plate, it will shoot off of the plate, or stick to it, even if the plate is held sideways or upside down. 6. Water Bender (You need a cup that you can poke a hole in, water, PVC pipe and a cloth. This is a classic but still fun. 7. Balloon Fight (You need balloons, thread, PVC pipe and cloth. When the conditions are just right, the balloon can almost levitate about the pipe. But most of the time you can have fun pushing the balloons around with the charged pipe. 8. Electroscope (You need, steel wire, jar, straw, aluminum foil, PVC pipe and a cloth) This one is really impressive to see in person. A really cool effect to try, which you can see in this video, is to rub the cloth on the pvc pipe from several feet away from the jar. When you run the pipe, you can see the aluminum foil pieces in the jar, moving. I was able to stand as far as 5 feet away and still see the effect. 9. Wingardium Leviosa (You need very light weight / thin plastic bags, cloth, PVC pipe) This is my favorite trick. Again, with the correct conditions, you can get the plastic pieces to float over foot above the pipe. Produce bags from the grocery store work great. You can float an entire produce bag in the right conditions. Have fun!
Views: 7822726 brusspup
REFLECTION OF LIGHT
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, +91- 9100061777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Reflection of lightDefinition: When light ray strikes the boundary of two media such as air and glass, a part of light is turned back into the same medium. This is called reflection of light.A highly polished surface, such as a mirror, reflects most of the light falling on it.Laws of reflection: 1.The angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection, and 2.The incident ray, the normal to the mirror at the point of incidence and the reflected ray, all lie in the same plane.These laws are applicable to all types of reflecting surfaces including spherical surfaces.Types of reflection: The types of reflection are regular reflection and irregular or diffused reflection.Regularreflection.It occurs when a beam of light falls on a smooth and polished surface such as a plane mirror. Irregular reflection. It occurs when a beam of light falls on a rough surface such as wall of a room.Incident ray:Light ray striking a reflecting surfacePoints of incidence:The point at which the incident ray strikes the reflecting surface.Reflectedray:The light ray obtained after reflection from the surface, in the same medium in which the.incident ray is travelling. Normal:The perpendicular drawn to the surface at the point of incidence. Angle of incidence:The angle which the incident ray makes with the normal at the point of incidence. It is denoted by the letter i.Angle of reflection:The angle which the reflected ray makes with the normal at the point of incidence.It is denoted by the letter r.Plane of incidence:The plane containing the incident ray and the normal. Plane of reflection:The plane containing the reflected ray and the normal
Views: 507590 7activestudio
What is the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle? - Chad Orzel
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-is-the-heisenberg-uncertainty-principle-chad-orzel The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle states that you can never simultaneously know the exact position and the exact speed of an object. Why not? Because everything in the universe behaves like both a particle and a wave at the same time. Chad Orzel navigates this complex concept of quantum physics. Lesson by Chad Orzel, animation by Henrik Malmgren.
Views: 2383016 TED-Ed
Quantum Theory - Full Documentary HD
 
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Check: https://youtu.be/Hs_chZSNL9I The World of Quantum - Full Documentary HD http://www.advexon.com For more Scientific DOCUMENTARIES. Subscribe for more Videos... Quantum mechanics (QM -- also known as quantum physics, or quantum theory) is a branch of physics which deals with physical phenomena at nanoscopic scales where the action is on the order of the Planck constant. It departs from classical mechanics primarily at the quantum realm of atomic and subatomic length scales. Quantum mechanics provides a mathematical description of much of the dual particle-like and wave-like behavior and interactions of energy and matter. Quantum mechanics provides a substantially useful framework for many features of the modern periodic table of elements including the behavior of atoms during chemical bonding and has played a significant role in the development of many modern technologies. In advanced topics of quantum mechanics, some of these behaviors are macroscopic (see macroscopic quantum phenomena) and emerge at only extreme (i.e., very low or very high) energies or temperatures (such as in the use of superconducting magnets). For example, the angular momentum of an electron bound to an atom or molecule is quantized. In contrast, the angular momentum of an unbound electron is not quantized. In the context of quantum mechanics, the wave--particle duality of energy and matter and the uncertainty principle provide a unified view of the behavior of photons, electrons, and other atomic-scale objects. The mathematical formulations of quantum mechanics are abstract. A mathematical function, the wavefunction, provides information about the probability amplitude of position, momentum, and other physical properties of a particle. Mathematical manipulations of the wavefunction usually involve bra--ket notation which requires an understanding of complex numbers and linear functionals. The wavefunction formulation treats the particle as a quantum harmonic oscillator, and the mathematics is akin to that describing acoustic resonance. Many of the results of quantum mechanics are not easily visualized in terms of classical mechanics. For instance, in a quantum mechanical model the lowest energy state of a system, the ground state, is non-zero as opposed to a more "traditional" ground state with zero kinetic energy (all particles at rest). Instead of a traditional static, unchanging zero energy state, quantum mechanics allows for far more dynamic, chaotic possibilities, according to John Wheeler. The earliest versions of quantum mechanics were formulated in the first decade of the 20th century. About this time, the atomic theory and the corpuscular theory of light (as updated by Einstein)[1] first came to be widely accepted as scientific fact; these latter theories can be viewed as quantum theories of matter and electromagnetic radiation, respectively. Early quantum theory was significantly reformulated in the mid-1920s by Werner Heisenberg, Max Born and Pascual Jordan, (matrix mechanics); Louis de Broglie and Erwin Schrödinger (wave mechanics); and Wolfgang Pauli and Satyendra Nath Bose (statistics of subatomic particles). Moreover, the Copenhagen interpretation of Niels Bohr became widely accepted. By 1930, quantum mechanics had been further unified and formalized by the work of David Hilbert, Paul Dirac and John von Neumann[2] with a greater emphasis placed on measurement in quantum mechanics, the statistical nature of our knowledge of reality, and philosophical speculation about the role of the observer. Quantum mechanics has since permeated throughout many aspects of 20th-century physics and other disciplines including quantum chemistry, quantum electronics, quantum optics, and quantum information science. Much 19th-century physics has been re-evaluated as the "classical limit" of quantum mechanics and its more advanced developments in terms of quantum field theory, string theory, and speculative quantum gravity theories. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsVGut7G-dU quantum solace, quantum world, #quantum
Views: 7492783 Advexon Science Network
Quantum Physics Explained
 
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Quantum mechanics is the branch of physics relating to the very small. It results in what may appear to be some very strange conclusions about the physical world. At the scale of atoms and electrons, many of the equations of classical mechanics, which describe how things move at everyday sizes and speeds, cease to be useful. In classical mechanics, objects exist in a specific place at a specific time. However, in quantum mechanics, objects instead exist in a haze of probability; they have a certain chance of being at point A, another chance of being at point B and so on. Three revolutionary principles Quantum mechanics (QM) developed over many decades, beginning as a set of controversial mathematical explanations of experiments that the math of classical mechanics could not explain. It began at the turn of the 20th century, around the same time that Albert Einstein published his theory of relativity, a separate mathematical revolution in physics that describes the motion of things at high speeds. Unlike relativity, however, the origins of QM cannot be attributed to any one scientist. Rather, multiple scientists contributed to a foundation of three revolutionary principles that gradually gained acceptance and experimental verification between 1900 and 1930. They are: Quantized properties: Certain properties, such as position, speed and color, can sometimes only occur in specific, set amounts, much like a dial that "clicks" from number to number. This challenged a fundamental assumption of classical mechanics, which said that such properties should exist on a smooth, continuous spectrum. To describe the idea that some properties "clicked" like a dial with specific settings, scientists coined the word "quantized." Particles of light: Light can sometimes behave as a particle. This was initially met with harsh criticism, as it ran contrary to 200 years of experiments showing that light behaved as a wave; much like ripples on the surface of a calm lake. Light behaves similarly in that it bounces off walls and bends around corners, and that the crests and troughs of the wave can add up or cancel out. Added wave crests result in brighter light, while waves that cancel out produce darkness. A light source can be thought of as a ball on a stick being rhythmically dipped in the center of a lake. The color emitted corresponds to the distance between the crests, which is determined by the speed of the ball's rhythm. Waves of matter: Matter can also behave as a wave. This ran counter to the roughly 30 years of experiments showing that matter (such as electrons) exists as particles. Other video resources https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6DiVspoZ1E https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEl-fTtP2tw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVpXrbZ4bnU Articles - www.preposterousuniverse.com/eternitytohere/quantum/ http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/quantum-theory http://www.thekeyboard.org.uk/Quantum%20mechanics.htm
Views: 851060 Cosmology Today™
How Does a Camera Work?
 
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Take the free course at: http://www.allversity.org/courses/basic-photography Follow us for more videos at: www.facebook.com/allversity More videos at: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBBCCB798B85DA47B To understand the basic concept of photography one really needs to understand what a camera is. This lesson will show you the progression of the camera from a basic pinhole-camera into a modern digital camera. For more videos like this one follow us on Twitter @allversity Or at facebook.com/allversity
Views: 464135 Allversity
Top 10 Experiments For Kids with Light and Optics | STEM | Kid science Ep 32
 
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In this Episode of Jojo Science show we do 10 easy, amazing and interesting experiments for kids based on light. These experiments will spark kids interest in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math) Be careful and have adult supervision for all experiments The 10 experiments are: 1. Visualize a laser 2. Total Internal reflection 3. Light around the corner 4. Popping balloons with light (fresnel lens) 5. Appearing Coin 6. Switching Arrow 7. Make a rainbow 8. Catching a stream of light 9. Photoresistor Switch 10. Temperature and color Kid science is easy fun and educational. Subscribe to Kid Science: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaLhKqb6jy1_2XcpPahEPNw?sub_confirmation=1 These experiments are for education and entertainment purposes and are done under professional supervision. If you choose to repeat any of these experiments, it is at YOUR OWN RISK. The science of up: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3ZZI-ZeuUU Easy Kid science experiment on solar energy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPUGnQ4nRvs easy kid science experiment about photosynthesis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c07r6ne49Qg kid science experiment-make your own electricity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3Qwf4P6x9w kid science experiment radiometer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmO3hDCWJGg Bottle rocket kid science experiment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXgCTuoxWIE Make rainbows! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yxp2LDn8AA Make an electromagnet: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LnaV5DqNMGA Walk on Eggs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXiv6-q5F4I Make electricity from ice: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybtZpTOI_mk The science of bubbles how bubbles work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1GtFVhg5FA Make a Magnetic ferrofluid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRcHk-8ZrmQ Polymers Orbeez super absorbent polymers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i86_3uwhlP4 Plasma Ball https://youtu.be/WyYDRY5IWhk Miraculin https://youtu.be/QZRGKqiLbGM Subscribe to my toy channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfLBbJNKVNPkgDkK9z7IQDg?sub_confirmation=1
Einstein's Theory Of Relativity Made Easy
 
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http://facebook.com/ScienceReason ... Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity (Chapter 1): Introduction. The theory of relativity, or simply relativity, encompasses two theories of Albert Einstein: special relativity and general relativity. However, the word "relativity" is sometimes used in reference to Galilean invariance. The term "theory of relativity" was coined by Max Planck in 1908 to emphasize how special relativity (and later, general relativity) uses the principle of relativity. --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceMagazine • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- SPECIAL RELATIVITY Special relativity is a theory of the structure of spacetime. It was introduced in Albert Einstein's 1905 paper "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies" (for the contributions of many other physicists see History of special relativity). Special relativity is based on two postulates which are contradictory in classical mechanics: 1. The laws of physics are the same for all observers in uniform motion relative to one another (principle of relativity), 2. The speed of light in a vacuum is the same for all observers, regardless of their relative motion or of the motion of the source of the light. The resultant theory agrees with experiment better than classical mechanics, e.g. in the Michelson-Morley experiment that supports postulate 2, but also has many surprising consequences. Some of these are: • Relativity of simultaneity: Two events, simultaneous for one observer, may not be simultaneous for another observer if the observers are in relative motion. • Time dilation: Moving clocks are measured to tick more slowly than an observer's "stationary" clock. • Length contraction: Objects are measured to be shortened in the direction that they are moving with respect to the observer. • Mass-energy equivalence: E = mc2, energy and mass are equivalent and transmutable. • Maximum speed is finite: No physical object or message or field line can travel faster than light. The defining feature of special relativity is the replacement of the Galilean transformations of classical mechanics by the Lorentz transformations. (See Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism and introduction to special relativity). --- GENERAL RELATIVITY General relativity is a theory of gravitation developed by Einstein in the years 1907--1915. The development of general relativity began with the equivalence principle, under which the states of accelerated motion and being at rest in a gravitational field (for example when standing on the surface of the Earth) are physically identical. The upshot of this is that free fall is inertial motion; an object in free fall is falling because that is how objects move when there is no force being exerted on them, instead of this being due to the force of gravity as is the case in classical mechanics. This is incompatible with classical mechanics and special relativity because in those theories inertially moving objects cannot accelerate with respect to each other, but objects in free fall do so. To resolve this difficulty Einstein first proposed that spacetime is curved. In 1915, he devised the Einstein field equations which relate the curvature of spacetime with the mass, energy, and momentum within it. Some of the consequences of general relativity are: • Time goes slower in higher gravitational fields. This is called gravitational time dilation. • Orbits precess in a way unexpected in Newton's theory of gravity. (This has been observed in the orbit of Mercury and in binary pulsars). • Rays of light bend in the presence of a gravitational field. • Frame-dragging, in which a rotating mass "drags along" the space time around it. • The Universe is expanding, and the far parts of it are moving away from us faster than the speed of light. Technically, general relativity is a metric theory of gravitation whose defining feature is its use of the Einstein field equations. The solutions of the field equations are metric tensors which define the topology of the spacetime and how objects move inertially. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_relativity --- The Cassiopeia Project - making science simple! The Cassiopeia Project is an effort to make high quality science videos available to everyone. If you can visualize it, then understanding is not far behind. • http://www.cassiopeiaproject.com .
Views: 3187126 ScienceTV
Absorption of Light Energy
 
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Observe and explain the basic principles of absorption spectroscopy and electron transitions. Use a diffraction grating on an overhead projector to investigate the wavelengths of light absorbed by different color solutions. This video is part of the Flinn Scientific Best Practices for Teaching Chemistry Video Series, a collection of over 125 hours of free professional development training for chemistry teachers - http://elearning.flinnsci.com ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/FlinnScientific/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlinnScientific/ Website: https://www.flinnsci.com/
Views: 6118 FlinnScientific
Quantum Mechanics - Part 1: Crash Course Physics #43
 
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What is light? That is something that has plagued scientists for centuries. It behaves light a wave... and a particle... what? Is it both? In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini introduces to the idea of Quantum Mechanics and how it helps us understand light. Also, there's this thing called the ULTRAVIOLET CATASTROPHE! Want more Crash Course in person? We'll be at NerdCon: Nerdfighteria in Boston on February 25th and 26th! For more information, go to http://www.nerdconnerdfighteria.com/ *** Get your own Crash Course Physics mug from DFTBA: http://store.dftba.com/products/crash... The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1157090 CrashCourse
Bell's Theorem: The Quantum Venn Diagram Paradox
 
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Featuring 3Blue1Brown Watch the 2nd video on 3Blue1Brown here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzRCDLre1b4 Support MinutePhysics on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/minutephysics Link to Patreon Supporters: http://www.minutephysics.com/supporters/ This video is about Bell's Theorem, one of the most fascinating results in 20th century physics. Even though Albert Einstein (together with collaborators in the EPR Paradox paper) wanted to show that quantum mechanics must be incomplete because it was nonlocal (he didn't like "spooky action at a distance"), John Bell managed to prove that any local real hidden variable theory would have to satisfy certain simple statistical properties that quantum mechanical experiments (and the theory that describes them) violate. Since then, GHZ and others have managed to extend the theoretical work, and Alain Aspect performed the first Bell test experiment in the late 1980s. Thanks to Vince Rubinetti for the music: https://soundcloud.com/vincerubinetti/one-two-zeta And thanks to Evan Miyazono, Aatish Bhatia, and Jasper Palfree for discussions and camaraderie during some of the inception of this video. REFERENCES: John Bell's Original Paper: http://inspirehep.net/record/31657/files/vol1p195-200_001.pdf Quantum Theory and Reality: https://www.scientificamerican.com/media/pdf/197911_0158.pdf "What Bell Did" By Tim Maudlin: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1408.1826 Bell's Theorem on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell%27s_theorem 2015 experimental confirmation that QM violates Bell's theorem: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1508.05949.pdf https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.250402 Bell's Theorem without Inequalities (GHZ): http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.16243 Kochen-Specker Theorem: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kochen–Specker_theorem MinutePhysics is on twitter - @minutephysics And facebook - http://facebook.com/minutephysics And Google+ (does anyone use this any more?) - http://bit.ly/qzEwc6 Minute Physics provides an energetic and entertaining view of old and new problems in physics -- all in a minute! Created by Henry Reich
Views: 4370000 minutephysics
Understanding Absorption of Light - Why do we see different colors?
 
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Join Rebecca Emerich, Educational Outreach Manager, as she uses everyday objects to explain absorption and reflection of light. With flashlights, filters, lemons, limes, and gummy bears, you'll find out why we see different colors for different objects. To learn more about Edmund Scientific's educational resources, including labs and inspiration kits, please visit www.edmundscientific.com.
Views: 51430 Edmund Scientific
Electromagnetic waves and the electromagnetic spectrum | Physics | Khan Academy
 
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Created by David SantoPietro. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/light-waves/introduction-to-light-waves/v/polarization-of-light-linear-and-circular?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/mechanical-waves-and-sound/doppler-effect/v/doppler-effect-reflection-off-a-moving-object?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Physics on Khan Academy: Physics is the study of the basic principles that govern the physical world around us. We'll start by looking at motion itself. Then, we'll learn about forces, momentum, energy, and other concepts in lots of different physical situations. To get the most out of physics, you'll need a solid understanding of algebra and a basic understanding of trigonometry. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Physics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oGarQW2lE5PxhGoQAKV7Q?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 577790 khanacademymedicine
Principles of Electricity - Heat Light
 
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https://www.showmethephysics.com/home/notes/electricity/circuits/ResistanceWire.htm Scientific Advisors: Dr. Saul Dushman; Dr. Roman Smoluchowski; Dr. David Harker Prelinger Archives Production Company: Wolff (Raphael G.) Studios, Inc. Audio/Visual: sound, color Creative Commons license: Public Domain
Scientific Eye Light & Reflection S102LS47
 
19:07
1) What happened on August 11th 1999 2) What is a solar eclipse? 3) How many times bigger is the sun to moon? 4) Explain how we can see things? 5) What materials are best at reflecting light? 6) What is it called when light changes direction? 7) What is the ray of light approaching the mirror called ? 8) What is the ray of light leaving the mirror called? 9) What is the angle between the normal (Imaginary dotted line at 90° to the mirror) and the incident ray? 10) What is the angle between the normal (Imaginary dotted line at 90° to the mirror) and the reflective ray? 11) What is the connection between the incident and reflective angles? 12) Why is light used in communications? 13) What is an advantage of fibre optics?
Views: 22814 Lammas Science
Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle Explained
 
04:12
Heisenberg's uncertainty principle tells us that it is impossible to simultaneously measure the position and momentum of a particle with infinite precision. In our everyday lives we virtually never come up against this limit, hence why it seems peculiar. In this experiment a laser is shone through a narrow slit onto a screen. As the slit is made narrower, the spot on the screen also becomes narrower. But at a certain point, the spot starts becoming wider. This is because the photons of light have been so localised at the slit that their horizontal momentum must become less well defined in order to satisfy Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. I based this video on one by Prof. Walter Lewin of MIT: http://bit.ly/100Wk2K Henry (MinutePhysics) has previously made a video about Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle where he treats it as less spooky and more a consequence of waves: http://bit.ly/TV3xO5 Sixty Symbols has a great video on Planck's constant: http://bit.ly/11upebY Thanks to the University of Sydney for hosting this experiment, especially to Tom and Ralph for their assistance getting it working. Music: Kevin McLeod (Incompetech.com) Mirage and Danse Macabre
Views: 1616435 Veritasium
PRINCIPLES AND WORKING OF A LASER _PART 1
 
02:53
For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, 040-64501777 / 65864777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. PRINCIPLES AND WORKING OF A LASER:In our earlier session we have learnt different characteristic properties of Lasers.Now let us learn about the principles of working of laser.Generally laser works in the form of process which consists of 4 important processes.They are: 1.Absorption2.Spontaneous emission3.Pumping and population inversion and4.Stimulated emission of electromagnetic radiation.Now let us discuss about the processes that takes place in atoms. ABSORPTION:It is well known that, atom consists of different energy states.Let us consider two energy states of an electron.Let us say ground state as Egand excited state as Ex.When electromagnetic energy falls on the atom, in the form of light photon of frequency 'v'.Whereas electromagnetic energy is equal to the difference of Eg- Ex = hv.When it energy falls on the electron, it absorbs the energy and jumps from ground state Eg to excited state Ex.SPONTANEOUS EMISSION:As we already said, electrons jump from ground state to excited state.But the excited electrons that jumped to higher energy state, doesn't remain for longer period in that state and come back to their original ground state by losing its energy in the form of photons.The photons don't have any correlation in phase and thus considered as incoherent light.Thus the release of energy by the electrons on their own is said to be as spontaneous emission.Transition of electrons from one state to another state occurs random in time.By definition,Spontaneous emission is defined as the process in which the electrons in the excited atoms are released on their own from their higher energy state to the ground state.PUMPING AND POULATION INVERSION:As we already said, the transitioned electrons don't stay for longer time in the excited state.There are electrons of some substances or systems, where they remain in the excited state for longer period.Such systems are called ACTIVE SYSTEMS or ACTIVE MEDIA.These are generally compounds or mixtures of different elements.When electrons turn into active systems, their electronic energy levels are also modified and thus it acquires some special properties.Now let us discuss them in detail.Now let us consider atom has three electronic states E1, E2, E3 in active medium.Generally electrons exist in lower state called as Ground state E1.Let us number of electrons in ground state as N1.As we already learnt., Due to the process of absorption when electromagnetic energy equal to the difference of E3 -- E1 are incident on atom, electrons jump from state 1 to the excited state 3.Due to the process of spontaneous emission, the excited electron in the E3 state remains for less period, in order of 10-8sec.Usually most of the electrons loses its energy due to spontaneous emission and returns from E3 state to E1 state. The number of electrons in this state is said to be as N1.But some of the electrons may lose very less energy E3 -E2and jump to state E2.The less emitted energy by electrons is called as Thermal energy. This energy is absorbed by the medium itself.The transition or jumping of electrons from E3 state to E2 state is called as non-radiative transition (or) invisible transition. The electrons in this state E2 remains for longer period compare to state E1, in the order of 3 x 10-3milli seconds.This electronic state is called as Metastable state.
Views: 107534 7activestudio
The Periscope
 
01:03
Useful for CBSE, ICSE, NCERT & International Students Grade 07 Subject: Physics Lesson : Light Topic: The Periscope An apparatus consisting of a tube attached to a set of mirrors or prisms, by which an observer (typically in a submerged submarine or behind a high obstacle) can see things that are otherwise out of sight. Visit www.oztern.com to find personalized test preparation solutions for Pre Medical - AIPMT, AIIMS, JIPMER, State, Pre Engineering - IIT JEE, JEE MAIN, BITSAT, State and Foundations - Class 6 to 10.
Views: 67457 CBSE
How does a Light Bulb work? | Mocomi Kids
 
02:00
https://mocomi.com/ presents: How do light bulbs work? An informative video about the working of a light bulb. Check this out and find out for yourself! A light bulb is a simple apparatus that converts electric energy into light energy. The law of conservation of energy says that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, it simply changes form. A light bulb is able to take the the electricity supplied to it and change its form into something that can be used for illumination. A bulb is made up of a positive and a negative terminal embedded inside glass with a tungsten filament that joins the two. When electricity is supplied to the terminals, the flow of electrons heats up the thin filament in between. The electrons continue to bang against the filament until it heats up to the point that it begins to glow. This process happens extremely quickly. The filament is encased inside transparent glass to let the light shine through and also to protect it from overheating. The air inside the glass is actually a small amount of inert gas that helps prevent the filament from becoming too hot and breaking. When the light bulb has fused it means that the thin coil inside has snapped and therefore electricity cannot flow completely through the circuit. For more information about working of light bulbs, read: https://mocomi.com/how-does-a-light-bulb-work/ For more such cool physics videos and articles, go to: https://mocomi.com/learn/science/physics/ Follow Mocomi Kids, on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/mocomikids/ on Twitter https://twitter.com/MocomiKids on Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/mocomikids/ on Google+ https://plus.google.com/+mocomikids/ on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/mocomi-kids
Views: 220277 MocomiKids
Reflection of Light
 
02:46
Join Rebecca Emerich, Educational Outreach Manager, and see "Reflection of Light" in action with fun experiments you can try at home or at school! To learn more about Edmund Scientific's educational resources, including labs and inspiration kits, please visit www.edmundscientific.com.
Views: 2118 Edmund Scientific
Dr Quantum - Double Slit Experiment
 
05:04
Dr Quantum - Double Slit Experiment This clip is from: "What The Bleep Do We Know!?: Down The Rabbit Hole" and is used for educational purposes. http://www.whatthebleep.com/
Views: 8428345 Brad Cameron
2 The Principle of the Electron Microscope
 
10:21
How to Make a Microscope, Chapter 2 Unlike the optical microscope, the scanning electron microscope uses accelerated electrons in a vacuum to act as light to view the sample. An electron is the negatively charged particle of an atom orbiting around a nucleus. It can be released by heat or an electric field. Electrons are 2,000 times lighter than the smallest atom, thus they can be easily stopped or diverted when striking materials. Because electrons move freely only in a vacuum, there must be a vacuum in the entire column. To achieve this state, vacuum pumps are used along with various levels of vacuum. Dozens of millions to billions of electrons hit the sample per second. Electromagnetic lenses then focus the beam on the examined sample in an optimal way. During its journey, the electron beam passes through a number of apertures with various diameters, which stop electrons undesirable for creating an image. The electrons can either scan the sample step by step or go through the sample to show its inner structure, giving us the distinction between a scanning and a transmission electron microscope. Modern electron microscopes not only display, but also analyze, measure, and modify in 2D, 3D, and 4D.
3. Wave-particle duality of light
 
48:22
MIT 5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2008 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/5-111F08 Instructor: Catherine Drennan, Elizabeth Vogel Taylor License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 179812 MIT OpenCourseWare
Physics - Optics: Refraction (2 of 3) Light Ray Going From Air to Glass then back to Air
 
11:30
Visit http://ilectureonline.com for more math and science lectures! In this video I will show you how to find the displaced distance when a light ray goes from air through glass then out to air again.
Views: 78925 Michel van Biezen
How a Fluorescent Light Works - Schematic Animation
 
02:17
Animation shows the circuit of the first kind of fluorescent lamp called the preheat. See how the ballast and starting switch work to strike an arc in the lamp. See the timing of the AC power cycle and why the lamp flickers before it gets a good start. Model of lamp with and without a ballast. See the tungsten filaments warm up. To get the full description of how it works go to www.EdisonTechCenter.org/Fluorescent.html.
Views: 858651 EdisonTechCenter
Physics - Waves in the Real World: Huygen's Principle
 
14:42
This is the 2nd lesson in the series, "Waves in the Real World." It investigates a property of wave called diffraction. The lesson shows how to use the Huygen's Principle to predict the shapes of wave front at a barrier. The lesson also demonstrates how to use constructive and destructive interference to explain the diffraction pattern formed when laser light is shone through a thin slit. Source: Mindset Network Organization
Views: 22001 EducationCommonsRW
Young and the Wave Theory of Light - with Sir Lawrence Bragg
 
20:59
Sir Lawrence begins by outlining the two contesting theories of light: the particles theory and the wave theory, which were held in the eighteenth century. This he follows with a description and demonstration of Thomas Young's famous pinhole experiment; an experiment which validated the wave theory. Sir Lawrence turns to diffraction, showing its effects with the use of Young's original Wave Trough of 1800 and explaining interference fringes in a series of fascinating demonstrations. From the original programme notes: Sir Lawrence Bragg at the Royal Institution of Great Britain Since 1826 a series of lectures, planned for young people, has been given at the Royal Institution during the fortnight after Christmas. These lectures, 'adapted to a juvenile auditory' to use the nineteenth-century phase, were started as a new venture in science teaching. It is the tradition to illustrate the CHRISTMAS LECTURES with numerous experiments which are on an impressive scale and as far as possible of a novel type. Many experiments first shown in the Royal Institution theatre have become classical bench-experiments in schools and colleges, and many of the best popular scientific books have been based on CHRISTMAS LECTURES. A scheme was launched in 1955 to give corresponding lectures throughout the school year, because it seemed very desirable to use the facilities and traditions of the Institution to the full and thus make it possible for a larger audience to participate. The idea was proposed in the first place to a few science teachers in schools, and with their help it was started in a small way. The lectures had an enthusiastic reception, and the scheme soon grew to its present proportions – over twenty thousand young people now come to the lectures each year. The main idea behind them is to show experiments, illustrating the basic principles of science, which are on too large a scale or involve too complicated apparatus to be readily staged with school resources. The majority of the lectures are on physical subjects, but chemistry and biology are also represented. In 1965, Lord Bowden, who was then Minister of State in the Department of Education and Science, expressed a wish that the lectures given by Sir Laurence Bragg be recorded in the form of films, and arranged that a sum of money be earmarked for that purpose. The series Sir Lawrence Bragg at the Royal Institution is the result of his interest. The films have been commissioned by the Educational Foundation for Visual Aids and shot on the premises of the Royal Institution. At first an attempt was made to film the actual schools' lectures, but there were a number of drawbacks to this procedure. Ideal positions for the cameras were not possible in a crowded lecture room. An hour's talk is too long, the film had to be divided into three or four sections, and it was not easy to tailor beginning and ends to the sections. It was finally realised that it would be much better to shoot each film as a separate project, with no audience and complete freedom for the camera team to take the long shots and close-ups in the best way. The possibility of close-up shots is a great advantage, because it enables effects to be shown which it would be impossible to demonstrate in a large lecture room. The present series consists of sixteen films covering the schools' lectures dealing with magnetism, the properties of matter, and vibrations and waves. It is hoped to include electricity and other subjects in a further series. In the main, the experiments are those actually shown in the schools' lectures, modified for filming where desirable. The action before the camera is in each case carefully rehearsed so that the performance of the experiment is seen as clearly as possible. No attempt however has been made to prepare a 'script'. The talk is quite informal, not a prepared one, in the belief that it will be fresher and more interesting if given in this way. It is hoped that the imperfections, inevitable in an impromptu talk, will be overlooked for the sake of its more personal nature. Crown copyright information is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen’s Printer for Scotland. Subscribe to our other YouTube channel for weekly science talks and explosive short films: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRoyalInstitution We're on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/
Views: 2892 Ri Archives
Photosynthesis: Crash Course Biology #8
 
13:15
Hank explains the extremely complex series of reactions whereby plants feed themselves on sunlight, carbon dioxide and water, and also create some by products we're pretty fond of as well. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/product/1av/CrashCourse-Biology-The-Complete-Series-DVD-Set Like CrashCourse on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse This video uses sounds from Freesound.org, a list of which can be found, along with the CITATIONS for this episode, in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-29ai Table of Contents: 1) Water 1:16 2) Carbon Dioxide 1:32 3) Sunlight/Photons 1:43 4) Chloroplasts 1:57 5) Light Reaction/Light-Dependent 2:42 a. Photosystem II 3:33 b. Cytochrome Complex 5:54 c. ATP Synthase 6:16 d. Photosystem I 7:06 6) Dark Reactions/Light-Independent 7:55 a. Phase 1 - Carbon Fixation 8:50 b. Phase 2 - Reduction 11:31 c. Phase 3 - Regeneration 12:02 tags: photosynthesis, biology, science, crashcourse, plants, light, calvin cycle, respiration, water, carbon dioxide, sunlight, xylem, time lapse, stomata, chlorophyll, photon, plastid, chloroplast, oxygen, thylakoid, grana, lumen, stroma, chemistry, fusion, photoexcitation, photosystem II, electron transport chain, protein, cytochrome complex, carbon fixation, rubisco, phosphoglycolate, reduction, regeneration, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, G3P, glucose, cellulose, starch, life Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 5184814 CrashCourse
The Science of Light and Color for Kids: Rainbows and the Electromagnetic Spectrum - FreeSchool
 
04:38
https://patreon.com/freeschool - Help support more content like this! Light is everywhere! Have you ever wondered what light is, or where it comes from? Did you know that light is the only reason colors exist? Have you ever wondered why the colors of a rainbow are always in the same order? Light (visible light, if you're talking only about the light we can see) is part of the electromagnetic spectrum that includes radio waves, microwaves, gamma waves and more! Come learn about light and color and the science behind it in this fun and educational video. Like this video if you want to see more videos about SCIENCE! Subscribe to FreeSchool: https://www.youtube.com/user/watchfreeschool?sub_confirmation=1 Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/watchFreeSchool Check our our companion channel, FreeSchool Mom! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTcEtHRQhqiCZIIb77LyDmA And our NEW channel for little ones, FreeSchool Early Birds! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3OV62x86XHwaqsxLsuy8dA
Views: 295763 Free School
Reflection Refraction and Polarization of Light - with Sir Lawrence Bragg
 
18:45
Sir Lawrence begins by demonstrating some of the familiar effects of reflections and refraction by means of a beam of light passing through water, a prism and lenses. This is followed by a description of total internal reflection, a model of a diamond being used to demonstrate its effects. Sir Lawrence now turns to polarization, explaining what is meant by polarized light and illustrating its effects both experimentally and with the aids of models. From the original programme notes: Sir Lawrence Bragg at the Royal Institution of Great Britain Since 1826 a series of lectures, planned for young people, has been given at the Royal Institution during the fortnight after Christmas. These lectures, 'adapted to a juvenile auditory' to use the nineteenth-century phase, were started as a new venture in science teaching. It is the tradition to illustrate the CHRISTMAS LECTURES with numerous experiments which are on an impressive scale and as far as possible of a novel type. Many experiments first shown in the Royal Institution theatre have become classical bench-experiments in schools and colleges, and many of the best popular scientific books have been based on CHRISTMAS LECTURES. A scheme was launched in 1955 to give corresponding lectures throughout the school year, because it seemed very desirable to use the facilities and traditions of the Institution to the full and thus make it possible for a larger audience to participate. The idea was proposed in the first place to a few science teachers in schools, and with their help it was started in a small way. The lectures had an enthusiastic reception, and the scheme soon grew to its present proportions over twenty thousand young people now come to the lectures each year. The main idea behind them is to show experiments, illustrating the basic principles of science, which are on too large a scale or involve too complicated apparatus to be readily staged with school resources. The majority of the lectures are on physical subjects, but chemistry and biology are also represented. In 1965, Lord Bowden, who was then Minister of State in the Department of Education and Science, expressed a wish that the lectures given by Sir Laurence Bragg be recorded in the form of films, and arranged that a sum of money be earmarked for that purpose. The series Sir Lawrence Bragg at the Royal Institution is the result of his interest. The films have been commissioned by the Educational Foundation for Visual Aids and shot on the premises of the Royal Institution. At first an attempt was made to film the actual schools' lectures, but there were a number of drawbacks to this procedure. Ideal positions for the cameras were not possible in a crowded lecture room. An hour's talk is too long, the film had to be divided into three or four sections, and it was not easy to tailor beginning and ends to the sections. It was finally realised that it would be much better to shoot each film as a separate project, with no audience and complete freedom for the camera team to take the long shots and close-ups in the best way. The possibility of close-up shots is a great advantage, because it enables effects to be shown which it would be impossible to demonstrate in a large lecture room. The present series consists of sixteen films covering the schools' lectures dealing with magnetism, the properties of matter, and vibrations and waves. It is hoped to include electricity and other subjects in a further series. In the main, the experiments are those actually shown in the schools' lectures, modified for filming where desirable. The action before the camera is in each case carefully rehearsed so that the performance of the experiment is seen as clearly as possible. No attempt however has been made to prepare a 'script'. The talk is quite informal, not a prepared one, in the belief that it will be fresher and more interesting if given in this way. It is hoped that the imperfections, inevitable in an impromptu talk, will be overlooked for the sake of its more personal nature. Crown copyright information is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen’s Printer for Scotland. Subscribe to our other YouTube channel for weekly science talks and explosive short films: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRoyalInstitution We're on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/
Views: 2379 Ri Archives
Wave Optics Physics Science Theory Explanation तरंग प्रकाशिकी भौतिकी विज्ञान 12P0403 HINDI Part 3 PM
 
44:49
What is wave optics in physics? What is Huygens wave theory? What is the science of optics? What is Huygens light principle? What is geometrical optics in physics? What is a wavefront in physics? What is hygiene principle? Who gave Wave Theory? What is electromagnetic wave theory? What are the principles of optics? Who created optics? What is the science of light called? What is a wave and how is it produced? Why light is called electromagnetic wave? What is electromagnetic wave in physics? What is the difference between a wave and a particle? Who was the scientist who first postulated wave theory of light? Who gave wave nature of light? What is the wave theory of light? What are secondary wavelets? What is a ray in physics? What is plane electromagnetic wave? What is wave normal? Why is Huygens principle important? What type of waves does light travel in? What is Zone Plate physics? Does light travel in waves or particles? What are examples of transverse waves? Does light travel in a straight line or waves? What are slits in physics? What are coherent sources? What happens when light is diffracted? What is spherical wavefront? What is the meaning of surface waves? What are the properties of uniform plane wave? What is meant by monochromatic wave? What is meant by uniform plane wave? What is wavefront in optics? What are waves in physics? What is wave nature? What is the wave nature of light? What is classical wave theory? How light is a wave? What did Newton think light was? How did Isaac Newton discover optics? Why did Isaac Newton invent the color wheel? Who gave the theory of light? How does light act as a wave and a particle? Why does light act like a wave and a particle? Who created the wave theory? What are the frequency and wavelength ranges of visible light? What are Maxwell's equations used for? Why does light have wave and particle properties? What is light in simple words? Is matter a wave? Is everything made of waves? Are waves particles? How are waves generated? What are the types of waves in physics? What causes a wave? What is wavefront vmware? What is a wave motion? What is a plane wave definition? What is wavelet physics? Why do we use wavelet transform? What is wavefront of light? What are two types of wave motion? What is being transferred with a wave? Who discovered waves in physics? What is the study of ocean waves called? What travels on a wave? Who are the scientist of electromagnetic wave theory? What is a ray of light? What is phase difference in waves? What is a phase in material science? Can coherent waves be out of phase? What does phase angle represent? What does in Phase mean in physics? What does phasor mean? What is active and reactive power? How are capillary waves formed? Does the moon control the waves? What makes waves at the beach? What is a big wave called? What are the 7 types of waves in the electromagnetic spectrum? What are matter waves in physics? Why are waves formed? What factors influence the size of a wave? What makes a big wave? What is a series of waves called? What is the role of centrifugal force in forming Tides? How are waves formed? How tall can waves get in the ocean? How is wind formed? Where are waves generated? Where do ocean waves come from? How is wind created? How is matter a wave? How are all mechanical waves similar? What is the Heisenberg principle? What are the waves in electromagnetic spectrum? How many types of waves are there? Where are radio waves most commonly used? How far can radio waves travel? How do radio waves travel? How do radio waves help us? Why do radio waves travel so far? Are radio waves dangerous? Can radio waves travel through a vacuum? Are radio waves as fast as light? How are radio waves formed? Can radio waves travel through water? How are radio waves used in cell phones? How do we use radio waves? What is an example of a radio wave? What are radio waves science? How are radio waves used to understand the universe? Can we hear radio waves? Is light a wave or a particle? How do radio waves propagate? How fast do radio waves travel in air? Do cell phones give you cancer? What do radio waves do to the human body? Is it safe to eat microwaved food? At what speed do electromagnetic waves travel in a vacuum? Can radio waves travel through the atmosphere? Do radio waves have mass? Do light has mass? Do electromagnetic waves have mass? Do particles have mass? How are radio waves transmitted and received? How are waves transmitted? What happens to radio waves in the ionosphere? Do all electromagnetic waves move at the same speed? How EM waves travel in a vacuum? Do light and radio waves travel at the same speed? Is use of microwave harmful? Is microwave radiation harmful? Is microwaving milk bad? Are radio waves harmful to humans? Are RF waves dangerous? Are radio waves from mobile phones harmful? Why are radio waves dangerous? Do electromagnetic waves harm humans? How fast do electromagnetic waves travel through space?
Views: 180 PHYSICS MATHEMATICS
How to teach the reflection of light in the classroom
 
08:24
Unit 4: The Laws of Reflection - featuring an easy to understand and visual way of tracing light rays and how to make a simple periscope. Low cost science tips for resourceful and creative science teachers, to help present key science concepts and stimulate scientific thinking in the classroom.
Views: 81215 ScienceTeachingAlive
Underwater Candle - Science Experiment
 
01:52
How to burn a candle underwater. Simple science trick. Watch the flame continue to burn beneath the water level as the wax holds back the water. Other Videos: Pepper Plate Trick - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ho0o7H6dXSU Minions - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVAobSCnR9g Seesaw Candle - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgwkF2fbqBE Balloon Experiments - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=glQ2NrnDHWc Music: Look Busy - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Views: 7964393 DaveHax
The Secrets Of Quantum Physics (Full Astrophysics Documentary) | Spark
 
58:56
Professor Jim Al-Khalili traces the story of arguably the most important, accurate and yet perplexing scientific theory ever: quantum physics. The story of quantum physics starts at the beginning of the 20th century with scientists trying to better understand how light bulbs work. This simple question soon led scientists deep into the hidden workings of matter, into the sub-atomic building blocks of the world around us. Here they discovered phenomena unlike any encountered before - a realm where things can be in many places at once, where chance and probability call the shots and where reality appears to only truly exist when we observe it. Albert Einstein hated the idea that nature, at its most fundamental level, is governed by chance. Jim reveals how in the 1930's, Einstein thought he'd found a fatal flaw in quantum physics. This was not taken seriously until it was tested in the 1960s. Professor Al-Khalili repeats this critical experiment, posing the question does reality really exist, or do we conjure it into existence by the act of observation? Elsewhere, we explore how the most famous law of quantum physics – The Uncertainty Principle – is obeyed by plants and trees as they capture sunlight during the vital process of photosynthesis. Could quantum mechanics explain the greatest mystery in biology - evolution? Content Provided By TVF International. Any Queries Please Contact Us at [email protected] Subscribe to Spark for more amazing science, tech and engineering videos - https://goo.gl/LIrlur Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SparkDocs/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/spark_channel/?hl=undefined #JimAl-Khalili #quantumphysics #Astrophysics #science #technology #engineering #matter #mysteriesoflife #quantummechanics #universe
Views: 1209791 Spark
Wave Optics Physics Science Theory Explanation तरंग प्रकाशिकी भौतिकी विज्ञान 12P0402 HINDI Part 2 PM
 
45:00
What is wave optics in physics? What is Huygens wave theory? What is the science of optics? What is Huygens light principle? What is geometrical optics in physics? What is a wavefront in physics? What is hygiene principle? Who gave Wave Theory? What is electromagnetic wave theory? What are the principles of optics? Who created optics? What is the science of light called? What is a wave and how is it produced? Why light is called electromagnetic wave? What is electromagnetic wave in physics? What is the difference between a wave and a particle? Who was the scientist who first postulated wave theory of light? Who gave wave nature of light? What is the wave theory of light? What are secondary wavelets? What is a ray in physics? What is plane electromagnetic wave? What is wave normal? Why is Huygens principle important? What type of waves does light travel in? What is Zone Plate physics? Does light travel in waves or particles? What are examples of transverse waves? Does light travel in a straight line or waves? What are slits in physics? What are coherent sources? What happens when light is diffracted? What is spherical wavefront? What is the meaning of surface waves? What are the properties of uniform plane wave? What is meant by monochromatic wave? What is meant by uniform plane wave? What is wavefront in optics? What are waves in physics? What is wave nature? What is the wave nature of light? What is classical wave theory? How light is a wave? What did Newton think light was? How did Isaac Newton discover optics? Why did Isaac Newton invent the color wheel? Who gave the theory of light? How does light act as a wave and a particle? Why does light act like a wave and a particle? Who created the wave theory? What are the frequency and wavelength ranges of visible light? What are Maxwell's equations used for? Why does light have wave and particle properties? What is light in simple words? Is matter a wave? Is everything made of waves? Are waves particles? How are waves generated? What are the types of waves in physics? What causes a wave? What is wavefront vmware? What is a wave motion? What is a plane wave definition? What is wavelet physics? Why do we use wavelet transform? What is wavefront of light? What are two types of wave motion? What is being transferred with a wave? Who discovered waves in physics? What is the study of ocean waves called? What travels on a wave? Who are the scientist of electromagnetic wave theory? What is a ray of light? What is phase difference in waves? What is a phase in material science? Can coherent waves be out of phase? What does phase angle represent? What does in Phase mean in physics? What does phasor mean? What is active and reactive power? How are capillary waves formed? Does the moon control the waves? What makes waves at the beach? What is a big wave called? What are the 7 types of waves in the electromagnetic spectrum? What are matter waves in physics? Why are waves formed? What factors influence the size of a wave? What makes a big wave? What is a series of waves called? What is the role of centrifugal force in forming Tides? How are waves formed? How tall can waves get in the ocean? How is wind formed? Where are waves generated? Where do ocean waves come from? How is wind created? How is matter a wave? How are all mechanical waves similar? What is the Heisenberg principle? What are the waves in electromagnetic spectrum? How many types of waves are there? Where are radio waves most commonly used? How far can radio waves travel? How do radio waves travel? How do radio waves help us? Why do radio waves travel so far? Are radio waves dangerous? Can radio waves travel through a vacuum? Are radio waves as fast as light? How are radio waves formed? Can radio waves travel through water? How are radio waves used in cell phones? How do we use radio waves? What is an example of a radio wave? What are radio waves science? How are radio waves used to understand the universe? Can we hear radio waves? Is light a wave or a particle? How do radio waves propagate? How fast do radio waves travel in air? Do cell phones give you cancer? What do radio waves do to the human body? Is it safe to eat microwaved food? At what speed do electromagnetic waves travel in a vacuum? Can radio waves travel through the atmosphere? Do radio waves have mass? Do light has mass? Do electromagnetic waves have mass? Do particles have mass? How are radio waves transmitted and received? How are waves transmitted? What happens to radio waves in the ionosphere? Do all electromagnetic waves move at the same speed? How EM waves travel in a vacuum? Do light and radio waves travel at the same speed? Is use of microwave harmful? Is microwave radiation harmful? Is microwaving milk bad? Are radio waves harmful to humans? Are RF waves dangerous? Are radio waves from mobile phones harmful? Why are radio waves dangerous? Do electromagnetic waves harm humans? How fast do electromagnetic waves travel through space?
Views: 203 PHYSICS MATHEMATICS
Peter Hurley - How to Understand the Inverse Square Law - Photo Lighting Explained
 
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Learn more on the full article here: https://fstoppers.com/education/peter-hurley-explains-how-inverse-square-law-applies-photography-167674 Learn more about the full tutorial here: http://www.fstoppers.com/store In this short excerpt from Fstopper's photography tutorial Illuminating the Face, headshot photographer Peter Hurley explains how the inverse square law works both mathematically as well as how it can be used in the studio to change the look of your portraits. For more scientific theory on how lighting works in photography, our favorite resource is a booked called Lighting: Science and Magic. Check it out here: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1110147-REG/focal_press_9780415719407_light_science_magic_5th.html/BI/6857/KBID/7410
Views: 405508 Fstoppers
The Nature of Light Vintage Education Film
 
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Nature of light, the coronet instructional film, demonstrates light as a form of radiant energy. Explains the principles of reflection & refraction & shows how these principles apply to the science of optics. Shows how 2 boys on early a.M. Fishing trip discover principles of reflection and refraction of light through simple experimentation. Diagrams explain the operation of camera & human eye. Year: 1948
Views: 2652 Boomers Day
Meet Science: Work and Energy Preview Video
 
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Learn about physics in a fun way with the newly released app, ‘Meet Science: Work and Energy’! ■ Best Way to Use ‘Meet Science’ - Watch animations with fun characters to learn about the concepts of work, energy and check what you’ve learned through quizzes. - Arouse scientific curiosities with experiment videos to experience various physical phenomenon. - Difficult words are explained and stories of scientists are told in glossary. Mini-games will help you understand the principle of Work and Energy. ■ Contents 1. Learn - Watch comprehensive educational animations about the core concepts of work, amount of work, various energy and their features and more. - Review the topics through OX, word quizzes and experiments related to each topic. 2. Experiments - Watch 14 experiment videos to find out how to make a vinegar rocket, how to open a bottle without the bottle opener and more. - Neatly organized summary notes will help you comprehend the experiments even better. 3. Glossary - Grasp the meaning of each word and find your favorite scientist with well-illustrated images. - Enjoy more interesting stories based on Work and Energy such as the story of a bus that runs on poop, warm house made of ice and the secret of pyramids. 4. Mini Games - Connect to Ring!: Use various machine cards to connect and roll the ball to ring the bell. - Throw to Pack!: Adjust the angle and distance of the lever to throw the candies into the pockets. - Fly to Goal!: Fly the hot-air balloon to dodge the obstacles and go to the goal. - Quiz game: Solve quizzes based on what you’ve learned. ■ About Meet Science ‘Meet Science’ series introduces physical subjects and various physical phenomenon. 1st edition, ‘Meet Science: Magnetism and Electricity’, presents the basic concepts of Electricity and Magnetism. - ‘Parent’s Choice Award 2014’ Mobile App Field Approved Award Winner! - ‘Best of the Best’ awarded by Best Apps for Kids receiving 5 starts in every category (Quality, Education, Entertainment, Values and Child Friendly) - “The best science app I’ve ever encountered. I love everything about the app. The learn section is awesome, and the recorded experiments are truly inspiring.” – Gees with Junior - “Best described as a science textbook on a tablet” – Children’s Technology Review 2nd edition, ‘Meet Science: Light and Sound’, introduces the principle of Light and Sound such as light, shadow, refraction, reflection and sound. - Nominated as ‘Top Pic Science App for Children 9-11’ by Fun Educational Apps - Nominated as ‘Best Apps for Kids 2014’ by Geeks with Junior - “One fantastic Science app for older elementary students, giving hours of learning and interactive play.” - Teachers with Apps Review - “This app is the perfect combination of information and entertainment” – Appy Mall Review 3rd edition, ‘Meet Science: Force and Motion’, introduces the core concepts of motion, referece point, speed, types of forces, inertia, action and reaction and more. - "Meet Science: Force and Motion helps kids approach scientific topics in a fun way" - Geeks with Juniors ■ About NC iactionbook NC iactionbook is an educational brand of NCSOFT. We aim to create both learning games for toddlers and preschoolers, and digital encyclopedia series for older children to enjoy with their whole family. Meet the Insects Series: Forest, Village and Water & Grass Edition Doodle Critter Math Series: Numbers, Shapes ■ How you can reach us! Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.iactionbook.com ■ Privacy We here at NC iactionbook consider your right to privacy to be of great importance. Our app includes: No third party advertisements No in-app purchases Parental-gate added for any Parents-Only zone
Views: 254 iactionbooks
Microscopy: Lenses and Image Formation (Daniel Fletcher)
 
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Learn more: https://www.ibiology.org/talks/lenses-image-formation-short-course/ Light microscopes use lenses. The basic properties of light, how light interacts with matter, the principles behind refractive lenses and how lenses form (magnified) images will be introduced in this talk.
Views: 33103 iBiology Techniques
16. Physics | Wave Particle Duality | Variation in Wavelength of Light Due to Reflection (GA)
 
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http://www.physicsgalaxy.com Learn complete Physics Video Lectures on Wave Particle Duality for IIT JEE by Ashish Arora. This is the most comprehensive website on Physics covering all the topics in detail. No wonder, in its trial run itself, this one of its kind website topped the world ranking on Physics learning. To keep yourself updated about physics galaxy activities on regular basis follow the facebook page of physics galaxy at https://www.facebook.com/physicsgalaxy74 The website, aimed at nurturing grasping power students, has classroom lectures on almost all the topics. It is an outcome of 23-year long toil of Physics expert who has made it a mission to simplify the complexities of Physics. Ashish Arora, the brain behind this interactive unique website, has all his lectures available on web for free of cost. He has created a youtube channel in the name of Physics Galaxy. Today more than 6000 video lectures are being watched per day on this website which is highest among any other e-learning website in India. Till now more than 3.6 Million videos are watched on it. On each video subtitles are also available in 67 languages using google translator including English, Hindi, Chinese, French, Marathi, Bangla, Urdu and other regional and international languages. Besides uploading transcripts of all his videos, he has created a software based synchronized European voice accent of all videos to benefit students in USA, Europe and other countries. Reference link of this video is at https://youtu.be/7lyze0gZizY
Views: 195 Physics Galaxy
Physics - How lightning occurs and how to stay safe during lightning - English
 
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This video is on how lightning occurs, static electricity and electrostatic discharge. About us: We are a social enterprise working on a mission to make school learning interesting, relevant and affordable to every child on this planet. You can watch our FREE online videos at http://www.bodhaguru.com/watch and download our practice application/games - just visit http://www.bodhaguru.com/play If you like our videos, subscribe to our channel http://www.youtube.com/user/BodhaGuruLearning. Feel free to connect with us at http://www.facebook.com/BodhaGuru OR http://twitter.com/Bodhaguru Have fun, while you learn. Thanks for watching -- Team BodhaGuru
Views: 290010 Bodhaguru
Wave Optics Physics Science Theory Explanation तरंग प्रकाशिकी भौतिकी विज्ञान 12P0404 HINDI Part 4 PM
 
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What is wave optics in physics? What is Huygens wave theory? What is the science of optics? What is Huygens light principle? What is geometrical optics in physics? What is a wavefront in physics? What is hygiene principle? Who gave Wave Theory? What is electromagnetic wave theory? What are the principles of optics? Who created optics? What is the science of light called? What is a wave and how is it produced? Why light is called electromagnetic wave? What is electromagnetic wave in physics? What is the difference between a wave and a particle? Who was the scientist who first postulated wave theory of light? Who gave wave nature of light? What is the wave theory of light? What are secondary wavelets? What is a ray in physics? What is plane electromagnetic wave? What is wave normal? Why is Huygens principle important? What type of waves does light travel in? What is Zone Plate physics? Does light travel in waves or particles? What are examples of transverse waves? Does light travel in a straight line or waves? What are slits in physics? What are coherent sources? What happens when light is diffracted? What is spherical wavefront? What is the meaning of surface waves? What are the properties of uniform plane wave? What is meant by monochromatic wave? What is meant by uniform plane wave? What is wavefront in optics? What are waves in physics? What is wave nature? What is the wave nature of light? What is classical wave theory? How light is a wave? What did Newton think light was? How did Isaac Newton discover optics? Why did Isaac Newton invent the color wheel? Who gave the theory of light? How does light act as a wave and a particle? Why does light act like a wave and a particle? Who created the wave theory? What are the frequency and wavelength ranges of visible light? What are Maxwell's equations used for? Why does light have wave and particle properties? What is light in simple words? Is matter a wave? Is everything made of waves? Are waves particles? How are waves generated? What are the types of waves in physics? What causes a wave? What is wavefront vmware? What is a wave motion? What is a plane wave definition? What is wavelet physics? Why do we use wavelet transform? What is wavefront of light? What are two types of wave motion? What is being transferred with a wave? Who discovered waves in physics? What is the study of ocean waves called? What travels on a wave? Who are the scientist of electromagnetic wave theory? What is a ray of light? What is phase difference in waves? What is a phase in material science? Can coherent waves be out of phase? What does phase angle represent? What does in Phase mean in physics? What does phasor mean? What is active and reactive power? How are capillary waves formed? Does the moon control the waves? What makes waves at the beach? What is a big wave called? What are the 7 types of waves in the electromagnetic spectrum? What are matter waves in physics? Why are waves formed? What factors influence the size of a wave? What makes a big wave? What is a series of waves called? What is the role of centrifugal force in forming Tides? How are waves formed? How tall can waves get in the ocean? How is wind formed? Where are waves generated? Where do ocean waves come from? How is wind created? How is matter a wave? How are all mechanical waves similar? What is the Heisenberg principle? What are the waves in electromagnetic spectrum? How many types of waves are there? Where are radio waves most commonly used? How far can radio waves travel? How do radio waves travel? How do radio waves help us? Why do radio waves travel so far? Are radio waves dangerous? Can radio waves travel through a vacuum? Are radio waves as fast as light? How are radio waves formed? Can radio waves travel through water? How are radio waves used in cell phones? How do we use radio waves? What is an example of a radio wave? What are radio waves science? How are radio waves used to understand the universe? Can we hear radio waves? Is light a wave or a particle? How do radio waves propagate? How fast do radio waves travel in air? Do cell phones give you cancer? What do radio waves do to the human body? Is it safe to eat microwaved food? At what speed do electromagnetic waves travel in a vacuum? Can radio waves travel through the atmosphere? Do radio waves have mass? Do light has mass? Do electromagnetic waves have mass? Do particles have mass? How are radio waves transmitted and received? How are waves transmitted? What happens to radio waves in the ionosphere? Do all electromagnetic waves move at the same speed? How EM waves travel in a vacuum? Do light and radio waves travel at the same speed? Is use of microwave harmful? Is microwave radiation harmful? Is microwaving milk bad? Are radio waves harmful to humans? Are RF waves dangerous? Are radio waves from mobile phones harmful? Why are radio waves dangerous? Do electromagnetic waves harm humans? How fast do electromagnetic waves travel through space?
Views: 104 PHYSICS MATHEMATICS
free energy device with magnet 100% free energy - New
 
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Hi Friends in this DIY you will know free energy device with magnet this 100% free energy make at home, It is New & Very easy to make an useful life hacks to build in your house with homemade things & magnet, I hope you enjoy this new invantions and see the next video PLEASE Subscribe my Channel sr hack. thank you.
Views: 12259902 S R hack
Physicist Breaks Down The Science Of 10 Iconic Marvel Scenes
 
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To celebrate the release of “Avengers: Endgame,” we had physicist (and lifelong comic book fan) Jim Kakalios take a closer look at the physics of the Marvel universe. Here he reacts to 10 memorable scenes from Marvel movies and rates them based on their accuracy. Find out what exactly quantum mechanics, time dilation, Einstein’s theory of special relativity, and spider silk tell us about the superheroes of the Marvel franchise. Which weapon would you rather have in a fight: Thor’s Mjolnir hammer or Captain America’s shield? Hint: The answer has to do with the conservation of energy — and the sonoluminescence of vibranium. Dr. Kakalios breaks down the physics behind this and many other Marvel phenomena, including Shuri’s holographic car in “Black Panther;” Peter Parker’s spider-webbing train save in “Spider-Man 2;” the multiverse theory of “Doctor Strange;” the role of Pym particles and the Higgs boson in “Ant-Man;” artificial gravity in “Guardians of the Galaxy;” and Tony Stark’s cybernetic helmet and gold-titanium exoskeleton in “Iron Man.” He sheds light on why Carol Danvers doesn’t age from “Captain Marvel” to “Avengers: Endgame;” why the Space Stone is so powerful when yielded by Thanos in “Avengers: Infinity War;” and what’s with all the talk of quantum entanglement, quantum tunneling, and “quantum mumbo-jumbo” in “Ant-Man and the Wasp.” Kakalios is the author of three books — “The Physics of Superheroes,” “The Physics of Everyday Things,” and “The Amazing Story of Quantum Mechanics.” He was a science consultant for Sony’s 2012 film “The Amazing Spider-Man.” Before that, he won an Emmy for his work as a science consultant for the Warner Bros. superhero film “Watchmen.” A physics professor at the University of Minnesota, Kakalios teaches a popular class that uses comic books to illustrate the principles of physics. For more, visit: https://www.amazon.com/Physics-Everyday-Things-Extraordinary-Ordinary/dp/0770437737 https://www.amazon.com/Physics-Superheroes-James-Kakalios/dp/1592402429 ------------------------------------------------------ #Marvel #Science #INSIDER INSIDER is great journalism about what passionate people actually want to know. That’s everything from news to food, celebrity to science, politics to sports and all the rest. It’s smart. It’s fearless. It’s fun. We push the boundaries of digital storytelling. Our mission is to inform and inspire. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: https://www.insider.com INSIDER on Facebook: https://insder.co/2NyYczE INSIDER on Instagram: https://insder.co/2xN5qFB INSIDER on Twitter: https://insder.co/2xyN5wE INSIDER on Snapchat: https://insder.co/2KJLtVo INSIDER on Amazon Prime: https://insder.co/PrimeVideo INSIDER on Dailymotion: https://insder.co/2vmKnZv Physicist Breaks Down The Science Of 10 Iconic Marvel Scenes
Views: 2800796 INSIDER